Monday, May 12, 2014

Susan JP Owens, Faery Rose author

Today Wild Women Authors is pleased to welcome author Susan JP Owens who brings Shelby Littleton, from Walking Into Her Heart, a Faery Rose, paranormal and fantasy, release from The Wild Rose Press. Welcome Susan and Shelby.
First up is Shelby. Where are you from? Originally from Central Texas and now Wyoming.
Tell us a bit about Walking Into Her Heart. It's about two people destined to be together while learning to trust one another and dealing with ancestral curses while surviving assassins.
What did you think the first time you saw Kyle? When I first met him, I literally couldn’t speak. He’s so handsome!
And your second thought? His eyes were stunning!
Did you think it was love at first sight? No, it was something deeper­-- drawing me closer to him. At the time, I didn’t understand all the powers pulling us together and the evil forces ripping our fragile relationship apart.
What do you like most about Kyle? There are several, but if I have to choose, he is an extremely patient man.
How would you describe him? He’s my hero in every sense of the word. Kyle never gave up on me. It took me forever to tear down the protective wall around my heart and to trust him fully without any doubt. Kyle stuck by me until I was ready. I had a lot of emotional baggage he had to deal with, but he remained by my side.
That is so sweet! Now, for the good stuff. . . how would he describe you?
I can answer that.
Hey, what a surprise! I’d like to introduce you to Kyle Pressley.
Hello everyone. I dropped by to give Shelby a family update and I want to answer the question. Shel is my soul mate, the other half of me. I never knew I needed Shelby until I met her. I’ll always love her and this may sound corny—Walking Into Her Heart was the best thing that ever happened to me. I have to go now—good talking to you all. Shel, I’ll see you at dinner.
Wow, he’s so sweet. Makes him a keeper in our book. What made you choose being in business for yourself as a profession? I love working long hours to reach my goals. The high I get when I attain them is a rush. Don’t get me wrong, being self-employed is a tough road and has many drawbacks, but I wouldn’t change it for the world. My sister, Alessa, has been my right hand and there are lots of changes coming over the next year.
How do you relax? I love unwinding in the hot tub with Kyle and have a glass of wine. And it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination where we end our evening together.
Who is your favorite fictional character and why? Indiana Jones – When the story is in a tense scene and you wonder what he’s going to do next to get out of trouble, his eyes swim with deviousness! Can you tell I’m a sucker for eyes?
Nah. Never entered our minds. What is the best piece of advice you ever received? A wise woman told me to trust the man who loves me and my own heart. I’ll never forget her words as long as I live. Hopefully, my life will last long enough to help vanquish the evil ones so the child will survive to help others.
Whoa, heavy stuff here. Let's get Susan up here for a second. What movies or books have had an impact on your writing? Romance books of all genres influenced me. It wasn’t any particular one, but the culmination. Walking Into Her Heart was created from a poignant dream I had and is the first book in “The First Realm Series”. Also, if I may tell you about, The Beginning Comes Quietly, The Dawning Series is in edits and should be out this summer. Yeah! And I have another series I’m hoping will be accepted soon. Crossing fingers!
Tell us a bit about your publisher. How did you hear about them? The Wild Rose Press is a marvelous publisher out of New York. I went to a retreat they sponsored and pitched three books to an editor. She asked me to email her a query letter, a synopsis and send the full manuscript.
Tell us a bit about the submission process. How long did it take from query to release? The span of time varies according to the length of the story. I probably drove my editor crazy because I constantly wanted to recheck the edits. My editor was a trooper from the beginning to the end which was a total of nine months. I know, I know, it was totally me. I had a hard time letting go and bless her heart, she supported me every single step. The Wild Rose Press has a great dedicated team, and they truly care about their authors.
Thanks for visiting us this week, Susan. Veronica and I wish you much luck with sales on this book and future series you have in the works.
Kat Doran and Veronica Lynch
To learn more about Susan JP Owens and the stories she creates go to: www.SusanJPOwens.com
To purchase Walking Into Her Heart, go to http://amzn.com/B00GVKH6N2

Monday, May 5, 2014

Kathryn Shay on Writing the Portals of Time Trilogy




Today, Wild Women Authors is pleased to welcome NYT's best selling author Kathryn Shay. Rather than get into a long harangue, we'll let her take the helm. . .
          I’ve been a science fiction fan since I was a child. I remember watching The Twilight Zone episodes with awe. I thought Rod Serling was a genius. As I got older, I started to watch science fiction movies and I remember being terrified of The Thing and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Later on in life, my favorite books and movies became 1984, Brave New World, The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Time Machine, Somewhere in Time, Soylent Green, Blade Runner, The Handmaid’s Tale and of the Star Wars series. Of course, now we have The Hunger Games Trilogy and Divergent which I thought were wonderful.         
          The stories I came to like most were those about the future and time travel. I discovered a lot of these plotlines on television, particularly in The Outer Limits and Star Trek. I remember watching all of the old episodes, over and over, and still catch them once in while on TV. I was fascinated by the future and what it might hold. Some were grim, showing the post-apocalyptic view—a barren world deprived of resources and often their humanity. But the future world in Star Trek showed a benevolent, advanced society, still with its problems, but professing the same values as we do today, only on a higher level. I eventually taught a science fiction class as a high school teacher where I expanded my knowledge of the shorter fiction on these issues.
          With that foundation, and when I became a published author, I always wanted to write some science fiction. But since my first love is romance, there never seemed to be an opportunity to combine the two genres until now. I came up with the original concept for the series years ago, but while shopping it around, I sold another book to Harlequin and they weren’t doing paranormal then. So I let the project go while I busily wrote what turned out to be 49 contemporary romances (so far). However, about 8 years ago, I went back to the time travel story. But so much had changed in society today. Many things I’d had as futuristic in the books were in place now, like the electric car needed for the plot of the first one, and much of the technological progress, especially in the Internet and Social Media world.
          In any work of fiction, every writer has to create his or her world, but in science fiction and fantasy all of that world has to be explained, whereas I don’t have to tell you what  a cell phone is in modern romances. It was great fun to create the world my women come from: the sad parts of living in a dome, the inability to bear children, a world that had to be torn apart before it could heal. But I also appreciated the peaceful nature of future centuries, the lack of any kind of materialism, and the interesting progress that was made in technology. Creating a society with corrupted language--a dog is a drog because there are no animals, supplements for food (think world hunger), clothing, how people read, exercise, what jobs they do was a real challenge. Most of the planning was done before I started this new version, but as I wrote, I found myself stopping to think, “Oh, that’s right, there wouldn’t have been day and night in the domes because the out of inside was covered with pollution.” Then I’d have to go back and interlace those elements into the books. And, yes, in case you’re wondering, I did have themes in mind: we are wasting our earth, we are too violent, we make drugs common, even when we have no idea their side effects, if we corrupt religion we will lose it. We must keep our interpersonal relationships as most important and if not, the result can be the sexual dysfunction of the future.
          The humor in the books was a total surprise: my forte has always been making people cry. I didn’t really think the metaphors would be as funny as they were, nor the women discovering the true meaning of intimacy in sex as delightful. That was a plus.
The entire writing of these books was a labor of love, done in twelve months. I don’t think I’d ever expand the trilogy or even write another futuristic, but as all writers have leaned, “Never say never.” Who knows what will evolve in my own personal future?




On Writing the Portals of Time trilogy


I’ve been a science fiction fan since I was a child. I remember watching The Twilight Zone episodes with awe. I thought Rod Serling was a genius. As I got older, I started to watch science fiction movies and I remember being terrified of The Thing and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Later on in life, my favorite books and movies became 1984, Brave New World, The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Time Machine, Somewhere in Time, Soylent Green, Blade Runner, The Handmaid’s Tale and of the Star Wars series. Of course, now we have The Hunger Games Trilogy and Divergent which I thought were wonderful. 
 
The stories I came to like most were those about the future and time travel. I discovered a lot of these plotlines on television, particularly in The Outer Limits and Star Trek. I remember watching all of the old episodes, over and over, and still catch them once in while on TV. I was fascinated by the future and what it might hold. Some were grim, showing the post-apocalyptic view—a barren world deprived of resources and often their humanity. But the future world in Star Trek showed a benevolent, advanced society, still with its problems, but professing the same values as we do today, only on a higher level. I eventually taught a science fiction class as a high school teacher where I expanded my knowledge of the shorter fiction on these issues.

With that foundation, and when I became a published author, I always wanted to write some science fiction. But since my first love is romance, there never seemed to be an opportunity to combine the two genres until now. I came up with the original concept for the series years ago, but while shopping it around, I sold another book to Harlequin and they weren’t doing paranormal then. So I let the project go while I busily wrote what turned out to be 49 contemporary romances (so far). However, about 8 years ago, I went back to the time travel story. But so much had changed in society today. Many things I’d had as futuristic in the books were in place now, like the electric car needed for the plot of the first one, and much of the technological progress, especially in the Internet and Social Media world.

In any work of fiction, every writer has to create his or her world, but in science fiction and fantasy all of that world has to be explained, whereas I don’t have to tell you what a cell phone is in modern romances. It was great fun to create the world my women come from: the sad parts of living in a dome, the inability to bear children, a world that had to be torn apart before it could heal. But I also appreciated the peaceful nature of future centuries, the lack of any kind of materialism, and the interesting progress that was made in technology. Creating a society with corrupted language--a dog is a drog because there are no animals, supplements for food (think world hunger), clothing, how people read, exercise, what jobs they do was a real challenge. Most of the planning was done before I started this new version, but as I wrote, I found myself stopping to think, “Oh, that’s right, there wouldn’t have been day and night in the domes because the out of inside was covered with pollution.” Then I’d have to go back and interlace those elements into the books. And, yes, in case you’re wondering, I did have themes in mind: we are wasting our earth, we are too violent, we make drugs common, even when we have no idea their side effects, if we corrupt religion we will lose it. We must keep our interpersonal relationships as most important and if not, the result can be the sexual dysfunction of the future.

The humor in the books was a total surprise: my forte has always been making people cry. I didn’t really think the metaphors would be as funny as they were, nor the women discovering the true meaning of intimacy in sex as delightful. That was a plus.

The entire writing of these books was a labor of love, done in twelve months. I don’t think I’d ever expand the trilogy or even write another futuristic, but as all writers have leaned, “Never say never.” Who knows what will evolve in my own personal future?